Home Dehradun Safe Labour can reduce infant mortality rate: Dr Sujata Sanjay 

Safe Labour can reduce infant mortality rate: Dr Sujata Sanjay 

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By OUR STAFF REPORTER
Dehradun, 17 May: Pregnant woman frequently have calcium deficiency due to which babies are more prone to diseases and face many problems. To avoid this problem, pregnant women should take adequate amounts of calcium. In addition to this, they should not eat papaya or chiku because these can increase the possibility of miscarriage. This was stated by Dr Sujata Sanjay, Obstetrician and Gynecologist at Sanjay Maternity Centre, here.
Dr Sanjay said that women should be aware of problems faced in pregnancy. Pregnant women ought to take a balanced diet, containing green leafy vegetables and fruits in addition to cereal, etc; they ought not to take any food that induces nausea and vomiting. Lack of calcium caused osteomalacia, which also affects the newborn, such as pelvic bone deformity which hinders normal delivery. Pregnant women should not go up and down stairs and should avoid lifting heavyweights. They should avoid travel and using mobile phones.
Dr Sujata Sanjay described the Do’s and Don’ts of pregnancy and normal labour, as well as the difficulties. She described the different techniques and stages of labour, from the traditional ways to the newer ones. It was also very important to get pregnancy monitored under a qualified doctor. She added that conception in women had become difficult and infertility was increasing by the day. Miscarriages had increased. This was becoming a social problem because of lifestyle change and busy schedule. Women were not aware about the common precautions which have to be taken. She urged them not to hide any problems.
She pointed out that the infant mortality rate is 40 per 1000 live births in Uttarakhand putting the state in 18th position among 29 states of India. People needed also to change their mindset to decrease the incidence of sex determination and female foeticide. Uttarakhand has a sex ratio of 888 females per 1000 male children as per data of 2015-2016.