Home Dehradun Swami Rama Himalayan University receives patent for improvements on Petri dish

Swami Rama Himalayan University receives patent for improvements on Petri dish

467
0
SHARE

By Our Staff Reporter

Dehradun, 23 Aug: An apparatus for spreading microbial culture on a petri dish developed
by the Swami Rama Himalayan
University has been granted a patent by the Patent Office, GOI.
The new invention by the Department of Biosciences of the University has added another feather to its cap. This invention
relates to a novel method and invention of an apparatus for spreading microbial cultures on a Petri dish.
The procedure has utility in evenly spreading the microbial culture on a soft microbiological growth medium in a Petri dish without damaging
the agar surface.
Traditionally, skilled laboratory technicians using a hand tool known as spreader, made up of glass, plastic, metal, or any inert material,
have performed the isolation of bacteria manually. Now this newly invented hand-tool or spreader typically includes a terminal loop to make multiple streaks.
Such microbial inoculation and streaking on Petri dishes are highly repetitious and, in many pathologies or diagnostic microbiology
laboratories, it is usually conducted in very high volumes, such as in volumes as high as 1,000 to 15,000 plates per day. It is tedious and
laborious work, for which reason is prone to error and inaccuracies. Another drawback of manual method of use of spreader by different
persons can significantly affect the counting of microbes, which leads to variable results. This is because different persons use diverse force and
techniques to spread the microbial culture using a spreader on an agar Petri dish. Due to the use of force and pressure, a significant reduction in microbial cell count has been reported. This reduction in microbial cell occurs during spread plating due to the physical impact of the
spreader on the solid microbial media, and this causes injury to microbial cells. Even bacterial spores have been reported vulnerable
to injury during spread-plating due to physical impact.
Therefore, to overcome the above-mentioned drawbacks, the present invention will greatly help in putting into effect a novel method and put to use a more efficacious method of homogenously spreading the microbial cultures on a Petri dish. The procedure has utility in evenly and uniformly spreading the microbial culture on a soft microbiological growth medium in the Petri dishes without damaging the agar surface in a reproducible manner.
The apparatus is made up of a tripod stand having a central vertical rod connected to a handle. Rotation of handle rotates the central rod, which rotates the horizontal smooth metallic rod. This horizontal
rod rotates softly on the agar medium surface in the Petri dish. The rotation of horizontal rod evenly and uniformly spreads the diluted microbial sample. Four to five rotations are sufficient to spread the
microbial culture evenly. Spreading of microbial cultures with the help of this novel apparatus does not physically harm the microbial
cells, thus leading to accurate and errorless results. The use of novel apparatus also saves tedious and laborious work of a technician.
Chancellor, SHRU, Dr Vijay Dhasmana stated, “At SRHU, we nurture creative thinking to discover new vistas of inventions in the quest of knowledge. The recent patent awarded to us is a utility patent based
on a novel microbiology method to isolate a single microorganism. In future, we will endeavour to focus on more discoveries, which will open up new frontiers for human welfare. I congratulate the researchers for their commitment and recognise their accomplishment with pride.”
“Universities are increasingly being looked as leaders in scientific research, innovation and economic development. At SRHU, we are working on new inventions,” stated the Vice Chancellor,
Dr Rajendra Dobhal.

“The utility patent awarded to us is based on a novel method and an apparatus used for spreading microbial cultures on a Petri dish without damaging the agar surface and microorganisms, leading to
precise and reproducible results,” added Dr Vivek Kumar, Associate Professor.